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Brazilian Steak House

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Traditionally called picanha in Brazil and other Latin American countries, this prized cut of meat holds amble amounts of flavor. Picanha is the national steak of Brazil and when you start talking about how to cook it you are going to run into a lot of highly passionate folks ...

In Brazil, the most prized cut of meat tends to be the picanha. There, the fat is retained until the steak has been cooked. In the United States, however, it tends to be removed unless requested otherwise by the customer




Churrasco is a Spanish and Portuguese term referring to beef or grilled meat more generally, differing across Latin America and Europe, but a prominent feature in the cuisine of Uruguay, Brazil, Bolivia, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Nicaragua, Peru, Guatemala and other Latin American countries. The related term churrascaria (or churrasqueria) is mostly understood to be a steakhouse.

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A churrascaria is a place where meat is cooked in churrasco style, which translates roughly from the Portuguese word for 'barbecue'.

In modern restaurants rodízio service is typically offered. Passadores (meat waiters) come to the table with knives and a skewer, on which are speared various kinds of meat, be it beef, pork, filet mignon, lamb, chicken, duck, ham (with pineapple), sausage, fish, or any other sort of local cut of meat. A common cut of beef top sirloin cap is known as picanha.




Caipirinha is Brazil's national cocktail, made with cachaça (sugarcane hard liquor), sugar, and lime. Cachaça, also known as caninha, or any one of a multitude of traditional names, is Brazil's most common distilled alcoholic beverage. Although both rum and cachaça are made from sugarcane-derived products, in cachaça the alcohol results from the fermentation of fresh sugarcane juice that is then distilled, while rum is usually made from refinery by-products such as molasses.

The drink is prepared by mixing the fruit and the sugar together, and adding the liquor. This can be made into a single glass, usually large, that can be shared amongst people, or into a larger jar, from which it is served in individual glasses.




In most parts of Brazil, the churrasco is roasted with charcoal. In the south of Brazil, however, mostly close to the borders of Argentina and Uruguay, embers of wood are also used.




Pao de queijo, "Cheese Bread" cheese bread is a small, baked cheese roll, a popular snack and breakfast food in Brazil. It is a traditional Brazilian recipe, from the state of Minas Gerais. Though its origins are uncertain, it is speculated that the recipe has existed since the eighteenth century, although it became popular around the 1950s




Creme de papaya is a Brazilian dessert, it was a culinary fad in Brazil in the mid-1990s. Tropical, sweet and light, the classic Brazilian Papaya Cream is a dessert that captures the essence of the season. Ready in a flash and made in the blender, with only 4 ingredients!